Name (Latin name)

Avera ge

Pe ak

Call Freq


HD Description


Durati on

kHz

kHz
















Barbastelle (Barbastella barbastellus)


4.1 ms


38.0


29-47



Castanette like smacks, quiet

Bechstein's (Myotis bechsteinii)

3.3 ms

61.0

35-108


Very fast series of clicks, quiet

Brandt's (Myotis brandtii)

4.2 ms

51.0

32-103


Very fast series of clicks, medium loud

Brown Long-eared (Plecotus auritus)

1.4 ms

40.0

29-92


Clicks and ticks, quiet

Common Pipistrelle (Pipistrellus pipistrellus)

5.5 ms

45.5

41-83


Wet slaps and clicks, loud

Daubenton's (Myotis daubentonii)

3.3 ms

47.5

32-85


Very fast series of clicks, medium loud

Greater Horseshoe (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum)

37.4 ms

81.0

69-83


Warbling sounds, loud, very directional

Grey Long-eared (Plecotus austriacus)

2.2 ms

40.0

29-92


Clicks and ticks, quiet

Leisler's (Nyctalus leisleri)

8.5 ms

29.0

25-54


Slow irregular metallic clicks, loud

Lesser horseshoe (Rhiolophus hipposideros)

31.7 ms

11 0.0

93-111


Warbling sounds, loud, very directional

Nathusius' Pipistrelle (Pipistrellus nathusii)






Natterer's (Myotis nattereri)

3.8 ms

53.0

23-115


Fast series of clicks, medium loud

Noctule (Nyctalus noctula)

20.0 ms

20.0

15-53


Slow irregular metallic clicks, very loud

Serotine (Eptesticus serotinus)

8.8 ms

31.0

25-55


Slow irregular smacks, loud

Soprano Pipistrelle (Pipistrellus pygmaeus)

5.8 ms

55.0

53-90


Wet slaps and clicks, loud

Whiskered (Myotis mystacinus)

3.0 ms

53.0

34-102


Very fast series of clicks, loud







Frequency & Audio Guide

We have tried to produce a summary guide here to all the species found in the UK, listing their frequencies and a description of the audio signal you should expect to hear. By using this chart in conjunction with the readout from any of our heterodyne or dual detectors, you should be able to narrow down the species of bat that you are monitoring. You will see that there is some overlap of frequencies between the various species, and so it is unlikely to give you a definitve answer, but combined with the visual and audio clues, identification should be possible. Please note when purchasing our units, that frequency division units do not give you a readout of frequency. They are still a popular choice for their ease of use, and as a first warning of the presence of a bat, but if you want to use frequency to help you identify species, you need to use a heterodyne or dual unit.